Re-sale prices are not predicted to come down this year.

For Buyers:

Re-sale prices are not predicted to come down this year.  Between August 2018 and January 2019 it looked like the market was going to balance out and cause prices to stabilize around the 2nd half of 2019.  However two things happened to change that prediction.  First, average 30-year mortgage rates dropped from a high of 4.94% in November 2018 to 3.82% as of June 2019.  That alone has saved buyers around $177/month on a median-priced $279,000 home with 4% down.  Second, private sector annual earnings in Greater Phoenix rose 1.8% in April after an 8-month period of stagnation.  In the last decade home prices have gone flat just twice, in 2011 and 2014.  Both times there was a corresponding decline in annual earnings. If annual earnings continue to grow and interest rates remain low, the Greater Phoenix seller market will continue to push home prices up this year.

For Sellers:

The May peak buyer season is over.  From this point through the end of the year it’s not uncommon to see contract activity gradually decline 30-40%.  The good news is that despite the predictable decline, listings under contract are coming in 3.7% higher than this time last year.  It’s not evenly distributed along all price points however.  Contracts on listings over $600K are up 3.4% while the $500K-$600K range is up an impressive 33.5%!! Contracts between $250K-$500K are up 16.1% and the low $200K’s are up 8.1%.  Lack of inventory under $200K means that contracts in this range are down 20.6%.  Expect your highest annual appreciation rates to be between 6-10% in the $150K-$225K range as this is where the majority of investor flip activity lies. $225K-$500K appreciation is between 3-5% and over $500K is between 1-3%.

Commentary written by Tina Tamboer, Senior Housing Analyst with The Cromford Report
©2019 Cromford Associates LLC and Tamboer Consulting LLC

Posted on June 8, 2019 at 8:52 pm
Eric Karlene | Category: Market Updates - Cromford Reports | Tagged , , , , ,

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Posted on May 2, 2019 at 5:11 pm
Eric Karlene | Category: Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Nov 2018 – The 4th Quarter is Seasonally the Best Time to be a Buyer

New Listings Up 18% in October between $250K-$400K
The 4th Quarter is Seasonally the Best Time to be a Buyer

For Buyers:
Seasonally the 4th Quarter is the best time to be a buyer and this year is no exception.  Typically buyer contract activity is at its strongest from March through May and weakest between November and January.  Buyers who were out-bid by competing offers last Spring will have a different experience now.  October saw 18% more new listings hit the market between $250K-$400K compared to last October while buyer contracts are about the same within the same price range.  There was only a 1% increase in new listings in the lower price range between $200K-$250K but a 12% drop in buyer contracts which caused overall supply to rise another 11%.  The market is still a seller’s market, but more seller competition for fewer buyers translates into more price reductions and seller concessions until the Spring “Buyer Season” is upon us once again.

For Sellers:
The market may be softening between $200K-$400K (which accounts for over 56% of MLS sales), but that doesn’t mean sellers are getting a raw deal.  Monthly average sale prices per square foot in this price range have appreciated 5% since October last year and nearly 19% in last 5 years.  Under $200K, the appreciation rate is 9.5% in the past year and 44% in 5 years.    $400K-$800K has appreciated 6% in the last year and 14% in 5 years and the annual average sale price per square foot* over $800K has appreciated 3% in the last year and 10.5% in 5 years.  What’s happening underneath that contract price, however, is an increased cost to sell at “top dollar”.  That cost can take the shape of longer days on market with multiple price reductions, repairs, needed upgrades to the home prior to list and closing cost assistance.

*Annual averages are used in the higher price ranges to mitigate the sharp price fluctuations that affect this market.
Commentary written by Tina Tamboer, Senior Housing Analyst with The Cromford Report
©2018 Cromford Associates LLC and Tamboer Consulting LLC

Posted on November 14, 2018 at 4:53 pm
Eric Karlene | Category: Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

For “As-Is” Transactions, Leave the Purchase Contract “As-Is”

For some reason, it is becoming increasingly common for sellers to expressly state in Section 8a of the Residential Resale Real Estate Purchase Contract (Residential Purchase Contract) that the Premises will be conveyed in “as-is” condition.

In February 2017, the Residential Purchase Contract revised Section 5a to express that the Premises are being sold in its “present physical condition as of the date of contract acceptance.” In other words, what you see is what you get. This change eliminated the need for the Arizona REALTORS® As-Is Addendum as well as the need for parties to specify in Section 8a that the Premises will be conveyed “as-is.”

While parties may include additional terms in Section 8a, writing in that the Premises will be sold “as-is” accomplishes nothing.

It should also be remembered that regardless of whether Section 8a of the Residential Purchase Contract specifies that the Premises will be sold in “as-is” condition, buyers may still request repairs. As stated in Section 5a, buyers and sellers “may, but are not obligated to, engage in negotiations for repairs/improvements to the Premises.” The Arizona REALTORS® Buyer’s Inspection Notice and Seller’s Response form remains available for this purpose.

Additionally, “as-is” in no way excuses a seller’s disclosure obligations. Even in an “as-is” transaction, sellers must still disclose known facts materially affecting the value of the property that are not readily observable and are not known to the buyer. Hill v. Jones, 151 Ariz. 81, 725 P.2d 1115 (App. 1986).

While drafting contracts, it is best to avoid redundant and thus superfluous terms. When parties attempt to restate the same proposition in a number of different ways, it becomes increasingly likely that the provisions will actually contradict one another. For this reason, the best course of action when conveying a property “as-is,” is to leave the Residential Purchase Contract “as-is.”

 – Scott Drucker, Esq.

 

 

Scott M. Drucker, Esq., a licensed Arizona attorney, is General Counsel for the Arizona REALTORS® serving as the primary legal advisor to the association. This article is of a general nature and reflects only the opinion of the author at the time it was drafted. It is not intended as definitive legal advice, and you should not act upon it without seeking independent legal counsel.

Cited From: https://www.aaronline.com/2018/10/01/for-as-is-transactions-leave-the-purchase-contract-as-is/

 

 

Posted on October 2, 2018 at 8:09 pm
Eric Karlene | Category: Info | Tagged , ,

10050 E Celtic Dr – Beautiful Scottsdale Remodel – Open House!

Posted on August 21, 2018 at 4:37 am
Eric Karlene | Category: Properties | Tagged , , , , , , ,